Jardin des Tuileries

 Jardin des Tuileries

The Tuileries Garden is the oldest and most historically significant French formal garden in the city of Paris. Named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Tuileries Garden offers a unique chance to see how French royalty from the Middle Ages to the 19th century conceived of the relationship between nature and city life.
The garden covers an area of about 255,000 square meters and began as an Italian-style garden in the XVIth century. It was Catherine de Médicis who had the garden constructed to the west of the Tuileries Palace. There, she had installed 14 alleys with various kinds of plant life, a fountain, a menagerie and a grotto. In the early 17th century, housing for orange trees and silk farming were added to the area.
In 1664 the Tuileries Garden was completely renovated by André Le Nôtre, a master landscape artist who, around the same time, was helping to design the extravagant gardens of the Palace of Versailles. The layout created by Le Nôtre is what visitors to the Tuileries Garden see today. In addition to a whole new layout, marble statues were also added to the garden in the early 18th century.
At present day, visitors will find seating conveniently scattered throughout the garden, giving them a place to rest and take in the sights. Since 1998, more modern statues have been moved to the Tuileries Garden, including works from Auguste Rodin, Roy Lichtenstein and Giuseppe Penone. Located in the 1st district — between the Louvre, the Place de la Concorde and the Seine — Tuileries is one of the most frequented gardens in Paris.

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How to get there

Walking distance from the Grand hotel du Palais Royal in less than 7 minutes.

Hotels near to Jardin des Tuileries

Hotel Louvre Marsollier Paris